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Sample Documention

This document serves as a sample template for documenting observations and incidents related to reasonable suspicion in the workplace. Each company may have its own specific form tailored to its policies and procedures. The purpose of this form is to provide supervisors with a structured framework for recording their observations, discussions, and actions taken when reasonable suspicion of substance misuse arises concerning an employee. By completing this form thoroughly and accurately, supervisors can ensure that all relevant information is documented for reference and follow-up actions. It is essential to adhere to company policies and guidelines and to maintain confidentiality throughout the process. They should also make observations, discuss, and take action when reasonable suspicion of substance misuse arises concerning an employee.

Documentation

The Department of Transportation (DOT) has specific regulations regarding documenting reasonable suspicion testing for safety-sensitive employees. According to DOT guidelines, supervisors or trained company officials who suspect an employee of violating drug and alcohol policies must document their observations and the reasons for their suspicion.

Key points regarding DOT rules for documenting reasonable suspicion testing include:

  1. Observations and Documentation: Supervisors must document specific observations, behaviors, or physical signs that lead to reasonable suspicion. These observations should be detailed, factual, and based on direct observations rather than hearsay or assumptions.
  2. Written Report: A report detailing the observed behavior and the reasons for suspicion must be completed promptly. This report should include the date, time, location, and circumstances surrounding the observed behavior.
  3. Two Observers are Better than One:  DOT administrations typically require at least two trained supervisors or company officials to corroborate observed behavior.  FMCSA regulations technically allow for only one supervisor to witness behavior; having two supervisors involved is often recommended as a best practice.
  4. Confidentiality: Confidentiality of the documentation and the entire process is crucial. Information regarding reasonable suspicion testing should be shared only with individuals directly involved in the testing process, such as designated company officials, medical review officers, and testing facility personnel.
  5. Follow-Up Actions: Supervisors must follow company policies and DOT regulations regarding the next steps after documenting reasonable suspicion and ordering testing. This may include arranging for transportation to the testing facility, meeting with the employee, and providing support or resources for assistance with substance abuse issues.
  6. Retention of Records: DOT regulations typically mandate that documentation related to reasonable suspicion testing be retained for a specified period. This ensures compliance with regulatory requirements and allows for future reference if needed.

By adhering to these DOT rules and guidelines, employers can ensure that reasonable suspicion testing is conducted fairly, consistently, and legally compliant, promoting workplace safety for all employees.

 

W.33– In-Cab Telehealth Support For Managing Chronic Diseases

“Almost all over-the-road truckers have a 12-volt thermoelectric cooler that keeps things roughly 30 degrees colder than the ambient outside temperature. That’s just cold enough to keep my sodas cold and any food fresh for about 4 days. They are an absolute must, so much so, that when my last one stopped working, I stopped at the next truck stop and bought a new one. When I leave out on tour, my wife will set me up with about a 3-day supply of fresh food packed in separate storage containers. Every Truckstop has microwaves available to drivers to use free of charge. Once my 3-day supply runs out, I start looking for a nearby Wally World (Walmart) where I can re-up my supplies.”

W.3.534 – In-Cab Telehealth Support For Managing Chronic Diseases

“Almost all over-the-road truckers have a 12-volt thermoelectric cooler that keeps things roughly 30 degrees colder than the ambient outside temperature. That’s just cold enough to keep my sodas cold and any food fresh for about 4 days. They are an absolute must, so much so, that when my last one stopped working, I stopped at the next truck stop and bought a new one. When I leave out on tour, my wife will set me up with about a 3-day supply of fresh food packed in separate storage containers. Every Truckstop has microwaves available to drivers to use free of charge. Once my 3-day supply runs out, I start looking for a nearby Wally World (Walmart) where I can re-up my supplies.”

W.3.534 – In-Cab Telehealth Support For Managing Chronic Diseases

“Almost all over-the-road truckers have a 12-volt thermoelectric cooler that keeps things roughly 30 degrees colder than the ambient outside temperature. That’s just cold enough to keep my sodas cold and any food fresh for about 4 days. They are an absolute must, so much so, that when my last one stopped working, I stopped at the next truck stop and bought a new one. When I leave out on tour, my wife will set me up with about a 3-day supply of fresh food packed in separate storage containers. Every Truckstop has microwaves available to drivers to use free of charge. Once my 3-day supply runs out, I start looking for a nearby Wally World (Walmart) where I can re-up my supplies.”

W.3.534 – In-Cab Telehealth Support For Managing Chronic Diseases

“Almost all over-the-road truckers have a 12-volt thermoelectric cooler that keeps things roughly 30 degrees colder than the ambient outside temperature. That’s just cold enough to keep my sodas cold and any food fresh for about 4 days. They are an absolute must, so much so, that when my last one stopped working, I stopped at the next truck stop and bought a new one. When I leave out on tour, my wife will set me up with about a 3-day supply of fresh food packed in separate storage containers. Every Truckstop has microwaves available to drivers to use free of charge. Once my 3-day supply runs out, I start looking for a nearby Wally World (Walmart) where I can re-up my supplies.”

W.3.534 – In-Cab Telehealth Support For Managing Chronic Diseases

“Almost all over-the-road truckers have a 12-volt thermoelectric cooler that keeps things roughly 30 degrees colder than the ambient outside temperature. That’s just cold enough to keep my sodas cold and any food fresh for about 4 days. They are an absolute must, so much so, that when my last one stopped working, I stopped at the next truck stop and bought a new one. When I leave out on tour, my wife will set me up with about a 3-day supply of fresh food packed in separate storage containers. Every Truckstop has microwaves available to drivers to use free of charge. Once my 3-day supply runs out, I start looking for a nearby Wally World (Walmart) where I can re-up my supplies.”

W.3.534 – In-Cab Telehealth Support For Managing Chronic Diseases

“Almost all over-the-road truckers have a 12-volt thermoelectric cooler that keeps things roughly 30 degrees colder than the ambient outside temperature. That’s just cold enough to keep my sodas cold and any food fresh for about 4 days. They are an absolute must, so much so, that when my last one stopped working, I stopped at the next truck stop and bought a new one. When I leave out on tour, my wife will set me up with about a 3-day supply of fresh food packed in separate storage containers. Every Truckstop has microwaves available to drivers to use free of charge. Once my 3-day supply runs out, I start looking for a nearby Wally World (Walmart) where I can re-up my supplies.”

Fronted – W4.6 – Planning Ahead to Eat Well

“Almost all over-the-road truckers have a 12-volt thermoelectric cooler that keeps things roughly 30 degrees colder than the ambient outside temperature. That’s just cold enough to keep my sodas cold and any food fresh for about 4 days. They are an absolute must, so much so, that when my last one stopped working, I stopped at the next truck stop and bought a new one. When I leave out on tour, my wife will set me up with about a 3-day supply of fresh food packed in separate storage containers. Every Truckstop has microwaves available to drivers to use free of charge. Once my 3-day supply runs out, I start looking for a nearby Wally World (Walmart) where I can re-up my supplies.”

W.3.534 – In-Cab Telehealth Support For Managing Chronic Diseases

“Almost all over-the-road truckers have a 12-volt thermoelectric cooler that keeps things roughly 30 degrees colder than the ambient outside temperature. That’s just cold enough to keep my sodas cold and any food fresh for about 4 days. They are an absolute must, so much so, that when my last one stopped working, I stopped at the next truck stop and bought a new one. When I leave out on tour, my wife will set me up with about a 3-day supply of fresh food packed in separate storage containers. Every Truckstop has microwaves available to drivers to use free of charge. Once my 3-day supply runs out, I start looking for a nearby Wally World (Walmart) where I can re-up my supplies.”

W4.3 – Planning Ahead to Eat Well

Jackson: Planning Ahead Works For Me

“Almost all over-the-road truckers have a 12-volt thermoelectric cooler that keeps things roughly 30 degrees colder than the ambient outside temperature. That’s just cold enough to keep my sodas cold and any food fresh for about 4 days. They are an absolute must, so much so, that when my last one stopped working, I stopped at the next truck stop and bought a new one. When I leave out on tour, my wife will set me up with about a 3-day supply of fresh food packed in separate storage containers. Every Truckstop has microwaves available to drivers to use free of charge. Once my 3-day supply runs out, I start looking for a nearby Wally World (Walmart) where I can re-up my supplies.”

Brandon – I Plan My Week

I generally patrol alone and can never predict where I’m going to be when it’s time to eat, so I plan everything ahead. My work lunches have a simple, balanced focus.  Each meal has a lean protein source (usually chicken breasts), a carbohydrate source (usually white rice), and a healthy serving of vegetables.

Preparing my lunches for the week in one day is fairly easy.  I prefer cooking several lean chicken breasts in the slow cooker or pressure cooker with a jar of salsa or a uniquely flavored sauce from the grocery store (hunt down the lowest in sugar).  Literally, this is a two-ingredient recipe—the chicken and the sauce. Throw them in the cooker together, set the timer, and let it cook.  I also measure and cook enough rice for the week’s lunches in one large batch.  I have found that using a quality rice cooker not only simplifies the process, it makes fantastic rice. The last part is vegetables.  I measure out a few bags and boil them on the stove in a large pot.

Once everything is cooked, I use a food scale to measure and divide the food into serving-size bowls that have lids.  Because I measure calories and macronutrients, I have a preset amount that goes into each bowl.  Don’t stress if you don’t have a food scale—just eyeball the portions to start the habit.

Now each bowl has one serving of chicken, one serving of rice, and one serving of vegetables.  I let the bowls cool and then place them in the freezer.  Preparing lunch for the next day is now as easy as pulling a bowl out of the freezer and putting it in a bag.  I supplement my lunch with protein shakes and bars that I keep in my car just in case I am too busy to stop somewhere and heat up lunch.

Like almost everything else, the most difficult step in meal planning is just getting started. As Goethe said, “Everything is hard before it is easy.” My experience with meal planning has been overwhelmingly positive. I believe this process saves me time and money and significantly contributes to my overall health. Even when I’m tired and craving one of those bacon cheeseburgers, it’s tough to justify buying one when I have a healthy, delicious meal sitting right next to me that’s ready to go.

Esteban: All It Takes Is Planning

Unless you are flatbedding or bedbugging, or maybe doing food service delivery, this is a fairly sedentary occupation. Some drivers have fitness equipment such as resistance bands in the truck, but time gets to be an issue. It’s a little tough to find the energy and enthusiasm for a workout after putting in a 12+ hour day and 500 miles of traffic. Some drivers, who have a dedicated route and scheduled stops, carry a collapsible bicycle with them and go for rides when they can, but again, this option isn’t available to most of us.

It can be challenging to maintain your health on the road, but it’s not impossible:

  • Many modern trucks are equipped with a small personal refrigerator; or you can purchase a high-quality cooler. This will allow you to pack healthier food (and save you some money versus eating out all the time).
  • Every 150 miles or so, pull over somewhere safe and get out of the truck. Walk around, do some mild calisthenics, just do something active. This can also help keep you awake and alert.
  • When you are stopped for the day put on some trainers and take a brisk walk or jog around the truck stop. You can also pack a jump rope, exercise mat and even a pair of dumbbells.
  • Try to resist temptation if you must eat at the truck stop diner. You can have that big meal every once in a while, but don’t make it a habit.

As I said, it’s not impossible to maintain your health on the road. But you do have to take the initiative and find ways to do it. No-exercise potentially leads to chronic health conditions, such as obesity, heart disease & high blood pressure, and sleep apnea, which can lead to disqualification for the medical certification required to maintain a valid CDL.”

Holly – How I Take Care of My Officer

I try my hardest to make as many meals as I can that my police officer can take to work with him. IT. IS. NOT. EASY. He tires easily of sandwiches, salads aren’t “enough”, and he often can’t eat his meal in one setting if he has to go to a call. I got tired of opening his lunch box at the end of a shift and STILL SEEING IT FULL.! I also encourage him to make his own lunch from time to time because I run out of time and hands on some days.

Let me just say, I don’t succeed everyday at sending my hubby off with a delicious, healthy meal. Life gets in the way. However, I certainly try. I try because I don’t want to spend an arm and leg every week on him eating out. I also want him to be healthy but have a full stomach. With this line of work, it is important for our officers to stay healthy. I want him to eat a nutritious, yet good tasting lunch each day. Over the years I have learned a few helpful tips just by trial and error.

Here is how I MEAL PREP for my law enforcement officer:

Meal planning for the whole week is a huge time/money saver. I know exactly what I am making for dinner for the week and what I am sending him off with (unless he prefers something different, of course). I normally do my shopping on a day that he is off for a week in advance. We recently started buying meats from our local butcher. Believe it or not, it runs about 10 bucks cheaper than the supermarket, it is local meat, and mostly organic. Not to mention delicious. I will buy a large, whole chicken and cook it on Sunday. We use that chicken for meals throughout the week, like chicken rice bowls or chicken salad.

Jack – I prepare for the worst

Buy a cooler and some freeze packs that way you won’t have to ice it down adding extra weight. Fruits, vegetable sticks, meals in individual packs, healthy snacks in your grip. I know we had an agreement with the hotel lodging each room would have a refrigerator & microwave. Eating right is difficult on the road it’s do the best you can with what you got. Every trip is different pack for a 24-hour run gone 48 hrs. It’s alright to eat one junk food meal not every meal. When I changed runs my last 8 years on the road at the away terminal nothing was open except 7-11 after midnight. Funny you have a agreement that guarantees food service 24 hours a day and they think 7-11 is acceptable. That’s when I started carrying a cooler. Another piece of advice find some kind of can goods that usually you wouldn’t eat put in in your grip for emergencies. They’ll be times you get stuck out there on the hog (broken rails, snowstorms, flooding, derailments etc….) times when it might take hours to get picked up off the train in the middle of nowhere. That can of sardines, Dinty stew, spagettio’s ect….becomes mighty handy in these situations.

W.3.5 – In-Cab Telehealth Support For Managing Chronic Diseases

 

Truck drivers and other professionals working in remote locations are great beneficiaries of the expanded telehealth technology that has been driven by COVID. Here’s what the CEO of one major driver telehealth program has to say about their services. “Through the urgent care program, drivers will have 24/7 access to medical care for common illnesses and injuries via computer, mobile app or phone, including nights, weekends and holidays. “What we’ve learned in our work with transportation companies is that drivers’ schedules make it difficult for them to see a doctor when they’re sick or injured,” said Bill Goodwin, CEO of MeMD. “This results in a lot of absenteeism, which creates scheduling problems and delivery delays — especially for smaller companies. With virtual urgent care, it’s fast and easy for drivers to connect with a medical provider on the road, even in remote areas. In addition, medical professionals are available outside typical office hours to accommodate drivers’ schedules and remove barriers to care.”

“Truckers are uniquely vulnerable when it comes to receiving proper healthcare for reasons that extend beyond the mobility and unusual hours the job requires. Many truckers are independent contractors. They have few protections and aren’t covered by any kind of corporate health insurance, so they need to decide whether to purchase their own. Telemedicine is less expensive than traditional care, and it’s timely and mobile. It’s precisely what truckers need. Trucking-affiliated companies understand the potential benefits of linking drivers with medical services, so we can expect to see more companies offering telemedicine-focused insurance for those in the industry. It may not be comprehensive in the manner of traditional insurance, but because it’s mobile and affordable, truckers are more likely to use it, and that’s ultimately what matters. Long-distance trucking is a unique profession, and it isn’t going away. We’re a long way from self-driving tractor-trailers. So it’s important for the medical industry to bridge that gap. Telemedicine can make truck drivers healthier and make our roads safer, but it can also help truckers build relationships with the medical system that will encourage pursuing care in the long term. (healthworkscollective.com)

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Posts by Users

W.3.534 – In-Cab Telehealth Support For Managing Chronic Diseases

“Almost all over-the-road truckers have a 12-volt thermoelectric cooler that keeps things roughly 30 degrees colder than the ambient outside temperature. That’s just cold enough to keep my sodas cold and any food fresh for about 4 days. They are an absolute must, so much so, that when my last one stopped working, I stopped at the next truck stop and bought a new one. When I leave out on tour, my wife will set me up with about a 3-day supply of fresh food packed in separate storage containers. Every Truckstop has microwaves available to drivers to use free of charge. Once my 3-day supply runs out, I start looking for a nearby Wally World (Walmart) where I can re-up my supplies.”

Fronted – W4.311 – Planning Ahead to Eat Well

“Almost all over-the-road truckers have a 12-volt thermoelectric cooler that keeps things roughly 30 degrees colder than the ambient outside temperature. That’s just cold enough to keep my sodas cold and any food fresh for about 4 days. They are an absolute must, so much so, that when my last one stopped working, I stopped at the next truck stop and bought a new one. When I leave out on tour, my wife will set me up with about a 3-day supply of fresh food packed in separate storage containers. Every Truckstop has microwaves available to drivers to use free of charge. Once my 3-day supply runs out, I start looking for a nearby Wally World (Walmart) where I can re-up my supplies.”

Fronted – W4.6 – Planning Ahead to Eat Well

“Almost all over-the-road truckers have a 12-volt thermoelectric cooler that keeps things roughly 30 degrees colder than the ambient outside temperature. That’s just cold enough to keep my sodas cold and any food fresh for about 4 days. They are an absolute must, so much so, that when my last one stopped working, I stopped at the next truck stop and bought a new one. When I leave out on tour, my wife will set me up with about a 3-day supply of fresh food packed in separate storage containers. Every Truckstop has microwaves available to drivers to use free of charge. Once my 3-day supply runs out, I start looking for a nearby Wally World (Walmart) where I can re-up my supplies.”

Fronted – W4.6 – Planning Ahead to Eat Well

“Almost all over-the-road truckers have a 12-volt thermoelectric cooler that keeps things roughly 30 degrees colder than the ambient outside temperature. That’s just cold enough to keep my sodas cold and any food fresh for about 4 days. They are an absolute must, so much so, that when my last one stopped working, I stopped at the next truck stop and bought a new one. When I leave out on tour, my wife will set me up with about a 3-day supply of fresh food packed in separate storage containers. Every Truckstop has microwaves available to drivers to use free of charge. Once my 3-day supply runs out, I start looking for a nearby Wally World (Walmart) where I can re-up my supplies.”

W.3.534 – In-Cab Telehealth Support For Managing Chronic Diseases

“Almost all over-the-road truckers have a 12-volt thermoelectric cooler that keeps things roughly 30 degrees colder than the ambient outside temperature. That’s just cold enough to keep my sodas cold and any food fresh for about 4 days. They are an absolute must, so much so, that when my last one stopped working, I stopped at the next truck stop and bought a new one. When I leave out on tour, my wife will set me up with about a 3-day supply of fresh food packed in separate storage containers. Every Truckstop has microwaves available to drivers to use free of charge. Once my 3-day supply runs out, I start looking for a nearby Wally World (Walmart) where I can re-up my supplies.”

W.3.534 – In-Cab Telehealth Support For Managing Chronic Diseases

“Almost all over-the-road truckers have a 12-volt thermoelectric cooler that keeps things roughly 30 degrees colder than the ambient outside temperature. That’s just cold enough to keep my sodas cold and any food fresh for about 4 days. They are an absolute must, so much so, that when my last one stopped working, I stopped at the next truck stop and bought a new one. When I leave out on tour, my wife will set me up with about a 3-day supply of fresh food packed in separate storage containers. Every Truckstop has microwaves available to drivers to use free of charge. Once my 3-day supply runs out, I start looking for a nearby Wally World (Walmart) where I can re-up my supplies.”